Livereload magic, Gulp style!

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There's been a new name making some buzz in world of JS task runners lately: Pretty much like Grunt, Gulp gulp jshint options trading you to define a set of tasks and run them from the command line.

I find this makes gulp jshint options trading easier to gulp jshint options trading, but this is pretty subjective. This apparently adds some performance improvements to the readability, though I have not really paid attention to that.

We'll split this in two steps and start with the Express setup. But first of all, you'll need the gulp CLI installed on your system. A quick npm call will sort gulp jshint options trading don't forget to sudo if your system requires it, I always do: Now the gulp command is available, let's bootstrap our project. As the command provides no specific task, it will run whatever default defines. To get Express to host our project's file, we'll need a new dependency in the project.

Let's just npm install express --save-dev. You'll notice we're installing the actual express package and not a specific plugin for Gulp. Gulp encourages to use gulp jshint options trading libraries as is when the task has nothing to do with manipulating streams, like popping up a web server, launching tests… This makes running Express with Gulp pretty much the same as when creating a standalone Express app.

This gives us the following Gulp configuration to start up Express. The gulp command now pops up a gulp jshint options trading, and if you point your browser to https: The express startup could also have been a task of its own.

We'd just needed to wrap it in a gulp. Then we could have called it via gulp. It all depends on wether you need to launch express on its own or just use it when running other tasks. As for starting up an Express server, starting up a livereload server doesn't have much to do with manipulating streams.

This means no need for a specific Gulp plugin, we'll just use tiny-lr. We'll also need the connect-livereload middleware to inject the Javascript communicating with livereload in the pages served by Express. So let's add these dependencies:.

This makes us 3 steps away from having livereload set up. First on, starting up livereload! Express on port and tinylr on port If you go to https: You can skip this if you're using a browser plugin to communicate with the livereload server. This is the job of the connect-livereload middleware. We just need to load it before the the static configuration, which makes the startExpress function look like this:.

The pages served by Express now have a small bit of JS injected just before their body closing tag. This will make them react to the livereload updates. All that's left now is sending livereload notification when file changes. If you look up on the NPM registry, you'll find a plugin for Gulp called gulp-livereload.

It allows you to send notifications to gulp jshint options trading livereload server as part of your pipe chain. This would make the notifyLivereload function a bit more gulp jshint options trading But when processing files more heavily, it saves you from having to watch both the source files and their processed results. Reproducing the express and livereload configuration I usually run with Grunt turned out pretty simple. The Gulpfile ends up maybe a bit more verbose than the Gruntfile, but I find function calls way more easy to read than lots of nested Javascript objects.

What's that Gulp thing Pretty much like Grunt, Gulp allows you to define a set of tasks and run them from the command line. Express setup To get Express to host our project's file, we'll need a new dependency in the project. Let's just npm install express --save-dev You'll notice we're installing the actual express package and not a specific plugin for Gulp.

Adding some livereload magic As for starting up an Express server, starting up a livereload server doesn't have much to do with manipulating streams. So let's add these dependencies: We just need to load it before the the static configuration, which makes the startExpress function look like this: Thanks for staying till the end!

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Because I have never really been able to get away from it. Even the best IDEs feel cluttered and heavy to me. I guess I prefer a Less-Integrated Development Environment for some reason; one that hides its clutter under an obtuse scripting language and staggering configuration files.

But I'm not the only one. So far, trading some of the advanced tooling of good IDEs for vim's simplicity has been productive. But that's not to say that I don't like a good code toolchain.

With vim, and especially when developing JavaScript, the single most important practice I have adopted is in-editor code linting. Besides forcing cleaner code, linting catches a surprising number of bugs. I'll skip the discussion about which JavaScript linting tool is best and just say that I use jslint. Besides, as long as you trust the source, an opinionated linter is a good thing, not a bad thing. I have found two different ways of plugging jslint into vim - Jesse Hallet's jslint. However, it still seems to work, and all it really needs is an up-to-date version of jslint.

The syntastic jslint plugin makes use of the jslint executable. You can get the executable in your path like this: Install pathogen if you aren't already using it. Here we see syntastic in action. Open the location list using the syntastic command: Menu Close Home Subscribe. How I stopped worrying and learned to love Douglas Crockford I'll skip the discussion about which JavaScript linting tool is best and just say that I use jslint.

I like Syntastic a little better jslint. At first I didn't like this, but I'm starting to think that this is a saner way to do it. When errors are detected, they can be listed in the vim location list. This is really helpful when changes result in linting errors outside of the viewing area.

You can jump right to them. Install the jslint npm module. We want to use a current version of jslint, not the one that is packaged with jslint. It's important that the jslint npm module be installed in your module path. It might make sense for you to install it in the root directory of your project and add it as a dependency to your package. At the top of the file, change this block: A nice feature of jslint. It will look for this file in your home directory, your current working directory, and in the directory of the file being edited.

Very useful if you working on multiple projects with different jslint rules. Syntastic Syntastic can check the syntax of dozens of languages, many of which can use multiple linters or syntax checking tools. For JavaScript jslint, jshint, and others are supported. The vim docs are thourough and succinct, so check those out after you install.